About your Search

20130201
20130209
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
attacked and also facing scrutiny was nominee for cia director. one of the things he talked about is how much of the public and congress should know about the u.s. drove stride program. we would like to hear your opinion. what is the balance between government secrecy and the public's right to know? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online -- here is the headline in "the baltimore sun" this morning. brennan targeted over drones. looking at some of the opinions coming in on the editorial pages of the newspapers. "usa today" -- that is of the newspaper's editorial board opinion. jumping down, it says -- the opposing view that "usa today" publishes to give a counterpoint says end the u.s. -- covert drone war. naureen shah at columbia's human-rights institute writes -- she points out the war is waged secretly because the pakistani and yemen government have the time feared their citizens would oppose open u.s. and all -- involvement. what do you think? what is more important, government secrecy or the public's right to know? let's hear from walter from butler, indiana. a re
, with more than 400 cia strikes against targets in pakistan and yemen. that's eight times as many as under president george w. bush. and now nbc news's michael isikoff has obtained a 16-page justice department memo that makes the legal argument to justify this administration's use of drones to kill terror suspects, including american citizens. the government can order the killing of its own citizens without due process if those citizens are believed to be senior operational leaders of al qaeda or an associated force, even if there is no intel indicating they are involved in an active plot to attack the united states. today attorney general eric holder addressed the issue. >> we only take these kinds of actions when there is an eminent threat, when capture is not feasible, and when we are confident we are doing so in a way that is consistent with federal and international law. >> yet, according to the memo, the government gets to define the word "eminent" in a very broadway. the condition that an operational leader present an imminent threat of violent attack against the united states does
for the job -- brennan and his suitability for the job of c.i.a. director. mr. speaker, may i commend to my colleagues on both sides of capitol hill recording -- capitol hill regarding this issue and to the american people a powerful new documentary that examines in part some of the issues i have discussed today and their grave implications for our national security, public safety and freedoms. this documentary, called the grand deception, is a product of counterterrorism expert steven emerson's investigative project on terrorism. and it provides critical insights into the true nature of the, quote, global jihadist threat. including its expanding successes overseas and the danger it poses here at home. it chronicles the history of what i believe has been an officially sanked and willful blindness to that threat. it also lays bare the various ways in which such a practice is contributing to the emboldinning of our enemies, the undermining of our allies the steady erosion of our economy and our security. mr. speaker, let me close by noting as the previous gentleman did that today is ronald re
to the cia fact book, literacy rate overall is 20%. given those numbers, how difficult is it your job of getting information to afghanis? guest: when you see almost 28% of the country is illiterate, meaning more than 72% mark is illiterate, that means we are faced with people they are not easy to receive things or digest things, so it is very hard in a country like afghanistan with the fact that more than 70% are illiterate, on the other hand, in afghanistan security, reaching for the people because of bad [indiscernible] because of the geographic afghanistan, it is hard to work, but it does not mean it will stop us. host: our guest abdul mujeeb khalvatgar is director of nai media institute. we're talking about journalism in afghanistan, how afghanis get their news and the freedom of the press in that country. we want to take your phone calls on this. the numbers -- here is the world news section of the "wall street journal." afghan peace still sought in six months. i am wondering, is this the type of headlines afghanis would see, the second to read the newspapers or have the newspape
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)